Conclusion


The main use of forensic science is for purposes of law enforcement to investigate crimes such as murder, theft, or fraud. Forensic scientists are also involved in investigating accidents such as train or plane crashes to establish if they were accidental or a result of foul play. The techniques developed by forensic science are also used by the army to analyze the possibility of the presence of chemical weapons, high explosives or to test for propellant stabilizers.  The Daubert decision upheld that there are certain important differences between the quest for truth in the laboratory and the quest for truth in the courtroom.  Scientific conclusions are not exclusive and are subject to perpetual revision.  On the other hand, it is the duty of the judiciary to resolve disputes finally and speedily.  In criminal cases accused parties are convicted on the basis of testimony from forensic science experts, therefore much depends upon the reliability of evidence presented before Court of Law.  It is highly recommended that law enforcement officials and the members of society they serve must assure that forensic techniques are reliable.  Thus before forensic evidence is admitted in the Court, the techniques to find out that evidence must be properly studied and their accuracy must be verified.  Scientific evidence is not only valuable to a successful criminal prosecution, but it may also be crucial in the eyes of many jurors.